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or totally unrelated. this is nasa and there's little ole earth and the asteroid you can see the distance away from us, courtesy of nasa. right now a mere 25,000 miles, six minutes ago before we went on the air, it was at 27,000 miles, going very fast. and so, that's how they have it calculated not going to hit us or graze us, but buzz us in about an hour and ten minutes right here. i hope we live. just kidding. they say it's not going to hit us. not totally true and, but they say there's no 'cause for concern, hello. you never know, do you? and in other news we're following another major story for you today as the president heads to the windy city, his hometown, to deliver what's been billed pass a purely economic address. but there's he a growing sense that the economy will not be the only topic of discussion. this 174 shootings and 44 murders, so far, reported in chicago. that's just by february 3rd alone, all right? so it's going to get worse and it was really bad last year. last year, the city saw 506 murders, and more than 2400 shootings. and what a mess! all this after this 15-year
'm not a professor but -- >> i'm not actually an expert, so it's okay. how do we miss that? >> the thing is, nasa really is tracking thousands of objects that are objects of interest near earth asteroids. this thing was small and frankly the direction it was coming from was towards the sun. so we didn't see it. sometimes we spot things just days before they pass by. and some things we track for years in advance. >> so this we just barely -- or unfairly, we missed. we could miss other stuff. should we pour money into equipment or technology that would see more of that stuff, however small? i'm all for putting money into nasa. it's half a percent of our budget. only a small fraction of that goes towards this, monitoring the earth's asteroids. it might be important in the long run. but like i said, they do track some things for years. there's many things that we're aware of. but the solar system is not eight planets, there are millions of objects making up the solar system. >> you say you're not a professor, you come off as a very good one. thank you very much. i appreciate it. >> thanks. >> neil: i
of the meteorite's powerful landing. right now nasa is keeping close watch over an asteroid as it hurdles about 17,000 miles above the earth's surface. a record-setting approach near our planet and apparently it's under 50 feet wide. tom costello joins me from the newsroom. tom, what do we know so far about what happened in russia? >> it was absolutely unbelievable. it was spectacular. what's kind of interesting here is so many people in russia these days have these little go pro cameras because they want to capture when they're hit in a traffic accident or official corruption. we have many views of this asteroid traveling at 33,000 miles per hour slamming into the earth's atmosphere above southwestern russia. this happened at 9:15 this morning. this town has a million people in it. thankfully most of the debris actually fell outside of the town, but it blew out the windows in nearly every single building and in many, many homes, and keep in mind, these are soviet era designs, so they're not terribly well built. a short time ago i talked to a canadian who was living there in that particular part o
ago. nasa doesn't have the resources to look for asteroids. which is why a trio of american astronauts and rocket scientists are raising money to launch their own asteroid warning system called sentinel -- a dedicated telescope scanning the stars for threats. >> this asteroid is a wake-up call. that we should be looking out there. these things do hit the earth. >> reporter: scientists say we can keep the planet safe, if we just know what's out there, headed our way. neal karlinsky, abc news, seattle. >> in the meantime, thank the dentist who spotted it. >>> coming up next here, a kangaroo invasion on a golf course. what happened? that's next in our instant index tonight. as your life and career change, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust your retirement plan along the way. rethink how you're invested. and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices to help you fine-tune your personal economy. call today and we'll make it easy to move that old 401(k) to a fidelity no-fee ira. get corici
the kind of objects that nasa cannot predict ahead of time. they're too small to actually track. the as asteroid that's passing the earth later this afternoon is an object that nasa can pick up ahead of time and can track. by the way, the two events are not related in any way. it's just a chance circumstance that both of these happened on the same day. >> okay. well, let's talk more about this asteroid. as we said, we know that's coming. so every ten years we can expect this sort of thing that happened over russia to happen somewhere in the world and there's not much we can do about it? >> no. there's no way really to predict objects that small coming into the earth atmosphere. tellus museum here is part of the network of nasa set up with fireball cameras. we have several in the southeast. and a few in the west. and this is part of a project, an effort, to track bright meteors. and we track about 8 to 12 bright meteors every night over cartersville. but when we link it with other cameras, we can tell how fast, how high, and even plot where in the solar system these smaller objec
out of the government come from nasa or the military. and that's what we're seeing working. of course, a lot of spaghetti taxpayer dollars thrown against the wall. the market don't want electric cars or electric battery cars. it leaves them feeling like they'll be stranded in the woods without any gas or any power to get out of the woods. it stresses them out. so we talk a lot also about nat gas, yes, it's helped by the federal government, but that was a resource that was sitting there. electric batteries had to be developed by people with a lot of taxpayer money. >> morgan, even folks like from the "washington post," charles lane, was talking about how americans just don't want electric cars. for all the money we pour, for all the tax breaks we give to people who buy them, americans still don't want them because they deliver inferior performance at a much higher cost, like much of what the government does. >> yeah. so going back to my point, we streamline where we're make these investments and there is a wealth of data that shows that some of these investments have been very wasteful
: how much warning do we get? >> nasa tracks these things. they're able to track 90% of the asteroids that could come close to us. but in this case, there was really no warning. people don't know what's going on. >> brian: i remember in the video game, you could shoot an asteroid out of the sky. i know in armageddon, in the movies, bruce willis and ben affleck were able to -- who else was in that? were able to stop it. is that what we're going to have to do at some point? >> nasa does track these things and they have the capability to stop them before they come close to earth. >> brian: lasers? >> all sorts of things. >> steve: there has been a nasa plan to send some sort of ship onto an asteroid, but once again, the asteroid that's going to come between us and some of our satellites later today, that's going to be far away, right? >> it's relatively close. the closest they've come in centuries. so that's why people are a little nervous. but no, it's not going to hit us. >> alisyn: let us know if there is ever one coming, all right? >> brian: even if we're in sports or in an interview
should watch for fraud. nasa experts say about hundred tons of space debris hit the earth every day but most of the objects are tiny specks. >>> you can take everything you knew about the moon and forget it. scientists have made a stunning discovery. they analyzed monday rocks that the apollo astronauts retrieved and they said the moon had more water than scientists first realized. that could mean the moon was not created by a debris by a planetary collision. how did it form? they north sure. at the very least, it raises many questions. full study is in the journal nature geo science which you probably have their on the night stand. >> whiskey drink ers don't want anybody watering down their booze. the folks at maker's mark learned it the hard way. plus, a high stakes heist in manhattan. how robbers rode off with a fortune in the blink of an eye. "i'm only human" ] humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you q
? >> nasa has a program to search for these objects and we've done a good job at finding the large ones. we put the priority on finding the large one first. the one that hit on friday was really a tiny asteroid, pretty small. >> anna: it's wild that this tiny one caused this much damage. you say mostly what you're looking for are the ones that are 400 feet in size and up, right? >> yes. a city block and larger. those are ones that would reach the surface. the one that hit over russia was broken up by the atmosphere. so there was only the damage from the shock wave. the larger ones, if they reach the surface in one piece, can cause great damage. >> peter: when you talk about the larger ones, what are we talking about? something as big as a kilometer? do those exist? >> oh, yes. oh, yes. and that's about a half mile. nasa has done a good job of finding 95% of those ones. the idea is to find them many, many years before they could hit the earth and calculate when and where the hazard is and if there is a hazard sometime in the future, then we could possibly do something about it. >> steve: now
're a rocket scientist doesn't mean that you can't rock a hot haircut. we're going to introduce you to nasa's mohawk man. ue psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin. [ rv guy ] enbrel may not work for everyone -- and may not clear you completely, but for many, it gets skin clearer fast, within 2 months, and keeps it clearer through 6 months. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events, including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness. if you've
anywhere. >> reporter: the yearly catch is shipped to nasa's johnson space center. here in the non-december crypt building number 31... >> this is the air shower. reporter: ... where you have to suit up to protect the meteorites from contamination. the precious cargo is unpacked and catalogued under the watchful eye of curator kevin rider. >> they're frozen from the time they're collected and returned all the way along the legs of the journey to get to houston. >> reporter: each sample is carefully examined and given a name based on where it was found. so we get to see a martian meteorite. >> this sample is elephant morain 79001. it's a basaltic rock from mars. >> reporter: it was studying a martian meteorite found in antarctica that led scientists to the discovery that there was once water on mars. and those these ugly ducklings may all look similar to the naked eye each meteorite has different chemical and mineral content. under a polarizing microscope, there is beautiful... they're as beautiful as stained glass windows for it's what they may some day tell us that really matters.
history have combined to discover. so it will do that every month. >> watch more on former nasa astronaut ed lew and his urgent mission to save planet earth. this sunday on "the next list." ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] what's the point of an epa estimated 42 miles per gallon if the miles aren't interesting? the lexus ct hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. good afternoon. chase sapphire. (push button tone) this is stacy from springfield. oh whoa. hello? yes. i didn't realize i'd be talking to an actual person. you don't need to press "0," i'm here. reach a person, not a prompt whenever you call chase sapphire. why should saturday night have all the fun? get two times the points on dining in restaurants, with chase sapphire preferred. >>> welcome back to "starting point." a quick look at some of the top stories this morning. a critical court date this afternoon for george zimmerman, the man accused of killing florida teen trayvon martin. a judge will decide whether to move ahead with a stand your ground hearing in april. if zimmerman's attorneys are successful there and prove he ha
's atmosphere. it was traveling at around 33,000 miles an hour. nasa says the meteor released 20 amount the force of the hiroshima bombs. stress sweat. it's different than ordinary sweat. it smells worse, and it can happen any time -- to anyone! like when i fell asleep at movie night with all my coworkers and i totally dream snorted myself awake. i actually popped my head back so fast i'm pretty sure i have whiplash. stress sweat can happen to anyone, anytime -- and it smells worse than ordinary sweat. get 4x the protection against stress sweat. introducing new secret clinical strength stress response scent. ♪ starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. >>> federal prosecutors have charged former illinois congressman jesse jackson, jr., for allegedly misusing hundreds of thousands in campaign funds for personal expenses. jackson is said to be accepting a plea deal. his wife, sandy, faces one count of tax fraud herself. >>> in today's "office pol
her last words. her nasa good-bye. >> i take with me so many amazing memories and things that are in here, that are in here. i will treasurer forever. i'm going to miss you all so much. i love you very, very much. >> oh, dear. imagine you have family and her friends and you watch this, and it's going to be on air for the next nine weeks. some people argue here this reality show continuing to air this footage of reeva is in poor taste. others say it's just a fitting tribute. back to you. >> and her family supported it as well. thank you. appreciate it. the update on that tremendously complicated case. >>> a two-alarm fire at a recycling company in tampa, florida. they believe a pile of scrap metal caught on fire, but they don't know how. they plan to use foam to put out the flames and later they will use a bulldozer to try to move the scrap metal. >>> we have learned an aerospace executive has been fired after he allegedly slapped a crying toddler on a delta flight from minneapolis to atlanta. the company who employed 60-year-old joe hundley called his behavior offensive a
saw something strange in the sky last night, a streaking flash of light. nasa tells us it could have been another meteor or some sort of space debris burning up as it entered the atmosphere. fortunately, nobody was hurt in california. >>> some new details about christopher dorner's last moments. an autopsy showed the former l.a. cop died of a single gunshot to the head. they say at this point it looks like it was self-inflicted. dorner locked himself in a cabin that caught fire during the final standoff with police. >>> a new pope before easter? could pop. pope benedict xvi will step down at the end of the month. current rules make march 15th the earliest possible date to pick a new pope but the vet kat says the date could be pushed up if all of the cardinals make it to rome early for a vote. >>> weary passengers from a carnival cruise ship "triumph" today are adjusting to being back on dry land with running water and working toilets. the passengers finally departed the crippled ship early friday in mobile, alabama, the more than 4,200 passengers and crew were then taken to new orlea
katrina, sandy reshaped the coastline and devastated homes, businesses and lives. nasa says the evidence shows humans are contributing to global warming. still, the realities in washington test the bounds of how we as a nation respond. in his state of the union address, the president told members of congress that if they don't act, he will. >> eye will direct my cabinet to come up with actions we can take to reduce pollution, prepare communities for climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy. >> last year president obama rejected a permit to build the keystone pipeline. but democrats are torn between a base of supporters who strongly oppose the project and the potential business boom by adding thousands of new jobs into the work force. that permit now rests in the hands of the state department, and secretary john kerry, who in august suggested climate change is as dangerous as iran, nuclear weapons, and war. now, on february 8, kerry met with canada's foreign minister, and he promised a fair, transparent and prompt decision on that. i don't know. it's
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)